ExhibitionDec 10, 2020-Dec 1, 2021

Nobel Peace Prize Exhibition 2020

Photo: © Aida Muluneh for the Nobel Peace Center

The Nobel Peace Prize Exhibition 2020 will, for the first time ever, be shown in a digital version distributed via NRK. It will be available on NRK’s website from 10 December.

This year, the traditional Nobel Peace Prize exhibition can be visited from everywhere. For the first time, the Nobel Peace Center is collaborating with the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation (NRK) on a photo exhibition about this year’s Nobel Peace Prize laureate. One of Africa’s leading photographers, Aida Muluneh, has been commissioned by the Nobel Peace Center to make a photo series on food in war and conflict. It will be available world-wide on NRK’s website from 10 December.

People across the world will be able to experience the acclaimed photographer Muluneh’s photo essay completely online. The photo essay will be published on nrk.no and Nobel Peace Center’s website in English and Norwegian.

Title: “The road of glory”. Country: Yemen. The ongoing civil war in Yemen has led to the worst humanitarian crisis in our time. WFP is aiming to provide food assistance to 13 million people each month in Yemen. Photo: ©Aida Muluneh for the Nobel Peace Center

Yemen: "The Road of Glory"

The ongoing civil war in Yemen has led to the worst humanitarian crisis in our time. WFP is aiming to provide food assistance to 13 million people each month in Yemen. 

“I spent my childhood in Yemen and have vivid memories of the city, the colors, the buildings and people. And to think about it now, that all of it is gone, it’s hard to believe”.

- Aida Muluneh, photographer.

Title: “Dreams to ashes”. Country: Germany. Nazi Germany saw starvation as an effective way of implementing Holocaust, because it would attract less attention. Photo: © Aida Muluneh for the Nobel Peace Center.

Germany: “Dreams to ashes”

Nazi Germany saw starvation as an effective way of implementing Holocaust, because it would attract less attention. 

“A vision of World War II that always came back to me was the images of the striped uniforms with the star. How the cloth hung on the bareboned bodies, the sunken eyes, the skin and bones."

- Aida Muluneh, photographer.

Title: “The silence of hope”. Country: Syria. Controlling food and emergency aid has been an important war strategy for the regime in Syria during the ongoing civil was. This “surrender or starve”-tactic has been criticized by the international community. Photo: ©Aida Muluneh for the Nobel Peace Center

Syria: “The silence of hope”

Controlling food and emergency aid has been an important war strategy for the regime in Syria during the ongoing civil was. This “surrender or starve”-tactic has been criticized by the international community.

“In the midst of the rubble and destruction, hunger must have an impact on the moral of the citizens who went from having access all the modern things, only to a few years later to have to exists in an environment that must be surreal.”

- Aida Muluneh, photographer.

Nambia: “In which we remain”. The Herero massacre in German South West Africa (now Namibia) between 1904 and 1908, is seen as the first genocide of this century. Photo: © Aida Muluneh for the Nobel Peace Center

Namibia: “In which we remain”

The Herero massacre in German South West Africa (now Namibia) between 1904 and 1908, is seen as the first genocide of this century. Tens of thousands of Heroro and Nama people where killed, many by being pushed to desert to starve.

“I wanted to create a work that expressed the loneliness and great suffering of the Herero and Nama as they were pushed to the desert to die of starvation. To know that you will die in the desert and if you tried to return back you would also be killed.”

- Aida Muluneh, photographer.

Photo: © Aida Muluneh for the Nobel Peace Center

Vietnam: “The Rain of Fire” 

The chemical weapon “Agent Orange” was used by the Americans during the Vietnam war (1955-75) to destroy forests and farming land. 

“The sculpture of the flame is symbolic of the burning of the fields and also the emotional helplessness of the farmers.  They were victims of a senseless war and had no choice but to watch as the skies rained fire."

- Aida Muluneh, photographer.

The exhibition is supported by Yara International (Nobel Peace Prize Celebration Partner 2020), Canon (print partner) and Bergesenstiftelsen.

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Adult: 120 NOK

Student & Senior: 90 NOK

Children (12-18): 50 NOK

Children under 12: Free

Family (2 adults/ x children under 18): 240 NOK

Nobel Peace Prize Laureates: Free

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