Nobel Peace Center

Album

  1. Photo: Nobel Peace Center
  2. Photo: Nobel Peace Center
  3. Photo: Tore Meek / Nobel Peace Center
  4. Photo: Sara Johannessen / Nobel Peace Center
  5. Photo: Sara Johannessen / Nobel Peace Center

I have no enemies

12 Dec 2010–25 Apr 2011

In Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo’s defendant’s speech made on 23 December 2009, prior to him being sentenced to eleven years’ imprisonment, he stated: “I have no enemies”. These words inspired the Nobel Peace Center in creating a portrait of the imprisoned peace activist.

The 2010 Nobel Peace Prize laureate exhibition told the story of Liu Xiaobo’s brave and sustained struggle for fundamental human rights in China: from participation in the Tiananmen protests of 1989 and up until Charter 08.

The exhibition also provided insight into today’s China. An extensive photographic series, made in China for the Nobel Peace Center, highlighted the rule of law, the increased expectations and future prospects of the Republic and its people.

In 2009 Liu Xiaobo was sentenced to eleven years’ imprisonment and two years’ loss of political rights for “incitement to subvert state power”. The severe punishment he has received has contributed in making Liu the prime symbol of the struggle for human rights in China.

The Nobel Peace Prize has previously been awarded to dissidents and human rights defendents, such as Carl von Ossietzky, Martin Luther King Jr., Andrej Sakharov, Amnesty International, Aung San Suu Kyi and Nelson Mandela. Liu Xiaobo now joins this fellowship of outspoken human rights proponents.

The 2010 Nobel Peace Prize laureate exhibition consisted of photographs, films and texts provided by a range of contributors in both China and elsewhere.

This was the sixth time the Nobel Peace Center presented the Peace Prize laureate exhibition, and for the first time it opened in our largest exhibition hall, the Main Hall.

Interactive content and hardware was supplied by the Telenor Group.

Watch the online version of the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize laureate exhibition:

Overview of our former Nobel Peace Prize laureate exhibitions:

2009 Barack H. Obama – A Call to Action
Barack H. Obama regarded the Nobel Peace Prize as “a call to action”. This also became the title of the 2009 Nobel Peace Prize laureate exhibition. It was inspired by the connections between Alfred Nobel’s will and Obama’s visions and efforts to strengthen international diplomacy and multilateral cooperation, and a world free from nuclear weapons. The exhibition consisted of two parts: In the Entry Hall visitors were met by a series of large photo portraits of President Barack H. Obama. The photos were by photographers Callie Shell and Pete Souza, who have followed Obama closely for several years. The second part was a journey of discovery through time and space, disarmament and diplomacy. It also featured worldwide reactions to the awarding of the Nobel Peace Prize to Obama.

2008 Martti Ahtisaari – The Broker
During three decades, the former Finnish President has played a vital role in the peace and reconciliation work done in Namibia, Kosovo, Iraq, Northern Ireland and the Aceh Province in Indonesia. In 2008 he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. In this exhibition, Magnum photographer Jonas Bendiksen and BBC journalist Lyse Doucet gave a unique glimpse into the work of Martti Ahtisaari.

2007 Al Gore and the IPCC – Fever
The exhibition, like the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize, was divided in two parts. The world renowned photographer Anton Corbijn created six portraits of Nobel Peace Prize laureate Al Gore, bringing out sides of Gore that are rarely seen: Playful and casual, surrounded by the nature he works to preserve. The exhibition also consisted of pictures and text from the article series ”A Globe in Crisis” that was featured in the Norwegian business newspaper Dagens Næringsliv. Photographer Ørjan F. Ellingvåg and journalist Frode Frøyland have covered the activity of the IPCC, The Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Change.

2006 Muhammad Yunus and Grameen Bank – A fistful of dollars
The 2006 Nobel Peace Prize laureate exhibition was about Mohammad Yunus and Grameen Bank. Photographer Linda Næsfeldt’s pictures present a man and an institution that give poor people hope and a possibility to create a dignified life for themselves.

2005  – Make Power, Not War
Mohamed ElBaradei considered the nuclear threat of today to be greater than ever before. IAEA controls over 900 facilities for nuclear power in 71 countries in order to prevent dissemination of nuclear weapons. At the same time, IAEA promotes civilian use of nuclear power and related technology. The exhibit highlighted this controversial double role.